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Kazakh Yurt

ICTAC SCHOOL 2021 - FORMAL METHODS FOR AN INFORMAL WORLD

Summer School of the 18th International Colloquium on Theoretical Aspects of Computing

VIRTUAL EVENT organised by Nazarbayev University, Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan, September 1-7, 2021


Courses | Schedule


COURSES


  1. Software Engineering for Robotics: RoboStar technology (4 hours - Wed 1 Sep 13:00-17:00 GMT+6)

    RoboStar group, Department of Computer Science, University of York, England, UK

    Abstract:
    Use of simulation to support the design of software for robotic systems is pervasive. Typically, roboticists draw a state machine using an informal notation (not precise or machine checkable) to convey a design and guide the development of a simulation. This involves writing code for a specific simulator (using C, C++, or some proprietary language and API). Reactive robotics simulators do not normally generate code for deployment. Instead, simulation code is often reused after changes. So, there is potential loss of properties observed via simulation: because of the possibility of changes introducing errors, and because of the reality gap. The RoboStar technology supports a model-based, rather than (simulation) code, approach to development. Models are written using domain-specific notations in line with those accepted by roboticists. In this course, we will focus on modelling and verification using RoboChart, our design notation, and its tool. In RoboChart, software controllers are described by timed state machines. The semantics is defined using a process algebra, namely, tock-CSP, which we use for verification.


  2. Modelling interactions: digital and physical (2 hours - Wed 1 Sep 18:00-20:00 GMT+6)

    Computational Foundry / Ffowndri Gyfrifiadol, Swansea University, Wales, UK

    Abstract:
    The first part of this lecture will give a lightening introdction to the use of formal methods in human–computer interaction. This will include and overview of the kinds of models, and typical domains where techniques are currently applied. It will then outline some of the potential future directions for the field based on the “Trends and Gaps” chapter of “The Handbook of Formal Methods in Human-Computer Interaction”.
    In the second part we will focus on a specific area, the formal specification and analysis of systems that have both physical and digital aspects. This will include using physigrams, a extension of finite state networks for describing interactions with physical devices such as hand-held controllers. We will also look at the ways formal analysis contributed to the design of an internet-enabled ‘cafe open’ sign – IoT in action!

    Course Materials


  3. Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (2 hours - Thu 2 and Fri 3 Sep 16:00-17:00 GMT+6)

    School of Computer Science, University of St. Andrews, Scotland, UK

    Abstract:
    Formal methods have shown benefits across many domains, and are more commonly used for ensuring the correctness of critical systems. This course shows how logic-based formalisms and automated tools can help to address a variety of problems that arise in the healthcare domain. One such example includes how to improve and personalise treatments for patients with multiple chronic conditions (aka multimorbidity) and address patient safety concerns inherent in polypharmacy (e.g., the prescribing of 5 or more medications). The combination of efficient and formal verification techniques, such as constraint solvers and theorem provers, can be explored in this context to identify situations that arise and should be avoided when applying medical recommendations for different chronic conditions simultaneously. For example, drugs prescribed for different diseases may cause adverse reactions, health recommendations may contradict each other, and/or undesired medication side effects may arise. Instead, we would like to offer personalised treatments and find the preferred treatment for a patient in accordance to given criteria (e.g. drug efficacy, prevalent disease, patient allergies, preferences, etc.). In addition, this course will discuss how challenges arising in medicine can provide inspiration for further research on the foundations of formal verification.

    Course Materials


  4. A Tutorial to Maude (5 hours - Thu 2 Sep 15:00-16:00, Fri 3 Sep 14:00-16:00, Tue 7 Sep 15:00-17:00 GMT+6)

    Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Norway

    Abstract:
    Rewriting logic is a powerful and general, yet simple and intuitive, logic for specifying dynamic systems, and is particularly suitable to specify distributed computer systems in an object-oriented style.
    Maude is a programming/modeling language and high-performance analysis tool for rewriting logic. Data types are defined by equational specifications (which operationally can be seen as rich term rewrite systems), while dynamic behaviors are specified by (possibly conditional) rewrite rules. Maude models can then be subjected to: (a) simulation by rewriting; (b) reachability analysis by search; (c) various forms of temporal logic model checking; (d) symbolic analysis; and (e) various forms of theorem proving using associated tools.
    Maude has been successfully applied to a wide range of sophisticated systems, including: transport protocols, cloud-based distributed transaction systems, biological systems, human cognition, programming and modeling language semantics and analysis, cyber-physical systems, and so on.
    This tutorial gives an introduction to specification and analysis in Maude. It also briefly touches upon some applications of Maude, and extensions to real-time and probabilistic systems.

    Course Materials: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.


  5. Process Mining (3 hours - Thu 2 Sep 19:00-20:00, Fri 3 Sep 18:00-20:00 GMT+6)

    RWTH Aachen University & Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik (FIT), Germany

    Abstract:
    Process mining is the missing link between model-based process analysis and data-oriented analysis techniques. Through concrete data sets and easy-to-use software, the course provides concepts and tools that can be applied directly to analyze and improve processes in a variety of domains. The course explains the key analysis techniques in process mining. Participants will learn about process discovery techniques. These can be used to automatically learn process models from raw event data. Various other process analysis techniques that use event data will be presented, including conformance checking. Moreover, the course will provide access to easy-to-use software, real-life data sets, and practical skills to directly apply the theory in a variety of application domains. In recent years, we could witness a spectacular uptake in process mining. There used to be a gap between process science (i.e., tools and techniques to improve operational processes) and data science (i.e., tools and techniques to extract value from data). Mainstream machine learning and data mining techniques do not consider operational processes. Business Process Management (BPM) and Operations Research (OR) tend to start from models rather than data. Process mining bridges this gap. Currently, there are over 35 commercial process mining vendors (ABBYY Timeline, ARIS Process Mining, BusinessOptix, Celonis Process Mining, Disco/Fluxicon, Everflow, Lana, Mavim, MPM, Minit, PAFnow, QPR, etc.) and process mining is applied in most of the larger organizations. Example application domains include: finance (Rabobank, Hypovereinsbank, etc.), telecom (Deutsche Telekom, Vodafone, etc.), logistics (Vanderlande, etc.), production (BMW, Siemens, Fiat, Bosch, etc.), food (Edeka, etc.), fashion (Zalando, etc.), energy (E-on, etc.), transport (Uber, DB, Lufthansa, etc.), healthcare (AstraZenica, Medtronic, etc.), consulting (Deloitte, EY, KPMG, etc.), and IT systems (Dell, IBM, ServiceNow, etc.). The course will be at an introductory level. Participants should have a basic understanding of process and data modeling without knowing a specific notation or language. Participants are encouraged to download the provided process mining software and data sets. The demo sessions will provide smaller examples and show the application of both open-source and commercial software to the data sets provided.

    Course Materials


  6. Research and Industry (2 hours - Mon 6 Sep 14:00-16:00 GMT+6)


  7. Analyzing interactions: informally and formally (2 hours - Tue 7 Sep 18:00-20:00 GMT+6)

    Department of Computer Science, School of Engineering and Digital Sciences, Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan

    Abstract: Because of their purely mathematical nature and high complexity, formal methods are often perceived in industrial contexts as difficult to understand and detached from reality In fact, many aspects of reality are intuitively understood and informally described using conceptual rather than formal models. This is especially true in human-computer interaction, since, on the one hand, the human components of the overall system cannot be fully characterised in mathematical terms, and, on the other hand, analyst may come from very different backgrounds, including social sciences, and are unlikely to be expert in formal methods.
    The first part of this short course introduces an intuitive notation to describe human reasoning and behaviour and shows how to use it informally to analyse human behaviour and human-computer interaction. The second part considers conceptual models of memory processes and human behaviour from cognitive psychology in order to provide alternative formal semantics to the intuitive notation. This allows us to reconcile our intuitive notation with some formal methods presented in previous courses of the school in order to allow analysts who are not expert in formal methods to formally verify human-computer interactions. Finally, the last part of the course, explores possible research developments in using formal methods to validate interactive systems in the context of their real world usage.

    Course Materials


The lectures presented at the ICTAC School 2021 will be published in Springer's Tutorial line of Lecture Notes in Computer Science.

SCHEDULE

GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty


Schedule for Other Time Zone: GMT+1: London | GMT+2: CEST (Berlin, Paris, Rome) | GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok
Back to List of Courses


Wednesday, 1 September 2021 - GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty

12:45-13:00 - OPENING

13:00-17:00 - Software Engineering for Robotics: RoboStar technology
Ana Cavalcanti, James Baxter, Pedro De Oliveira Salazar Ribeiro, Alvaro Miyazawa (University of York, UK)

17:00-18:00 - BREAK

18:00-20:00 - Modelling interactions: digital and physical
Alan Dix (Swansea University, UK)



Thursday, 2 September 2021 - GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty

15:00-16:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 1)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

16:00-17:00 - Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (Part 1)
Juliana Küster Filipe Bowles (University of St. Andrews, UK)

17:00-19:00 - BREAK

19:00-20:00 - Process Mining (Part 1: Introduction)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)



Friday, 3 September 2021 - GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty

14:00-16:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 2)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

16:00-17:00 - Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (Part 2)
Juliana Küster Filipe Bowles (University of St. Andrews, UK)

17:00-18:00 - BREAK

18:00-19:00 - Process Mining (Part 2: Example algorithms)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)

19:00-20:00 - Process Mining (Part 3: Applications)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)



Monday, 6 September 2021 - GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty

14:00-15:00 - Research and Industry (Security Research at Oracle Labs, Australia: Program Analysis Meets Security)
Padmanabhan Krishnan (Oracle Labs, Australia)

15:00-16:00 - Research and Industry (Formal Methods Adoption in Industry: An Experience Report)
Ben Tyler (Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan)



Tuesday, 7 September 2021 - GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty

15:00-17:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 3)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

17:00-18:00 - BREAK

18:00-20:00 - Analyzing interactions: informally and formally
Antonio Cerone (Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan)


SCHEDULE

GMT+1: London


Schedule for Other Time Zone: GMT+2: CEST | GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty | GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok
Back to List of Courses


Wednesday, 1 September 2021 - GMT+1: London

7:45-8:00 - OPENING

8:00-12:00 - Software Engineering for Robotics: RoboStar technology
Ana Cavalcanti, James Baxter, Pedro De Oliveira Salazar Ribeiro, Alvaro Miyazawa (University of York, UK)

12:00-13:00 - BREAK

13:00-15:00 - Modelling interactions: digital and physical
Alan Dix (Swansea University, UK)



Thursday, 2 September 2021 - GMT+1: London

10:00-11:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 1)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

11:00-12:00 - Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (Part 1)
Juliana Küster Filipe Bowles (University of St. Andrews, UK)

12:00-14:00 - BREAK

14:00-15:00 - Process Mining (Part 1: Introduction)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)



Friday, 3 September 2021 - GMT+1: London

9:00-11:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 2)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

11:00-12:00 - Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (Part 2)
Juliana Küster Filipe Bowles (University of St. Andrews, UK)

12:00-13:00 - BREAK

13:00-14:00 - Process Mining (Part 2: Example algorithms)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)

14:00-15:00 - Process Mining (Part 3: Applications)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)



Monday, 6 September 2021 - GMT+1: London

9:00-10:00 - Research and Industry (Security Research at Oracle Labs, Australia: Program Analysis Meets Security)
Padmanabhan Krishnan (Oracle Labs, Australia)

10:00-11:00 - Research and Industry (Formal Methods Adoption in Industry: An Experience Report)
Ben Tyler (Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan)



Tuesday, 7 September 2021 - GMT+1: London

10:00-12:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 3)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

12:00-13:00 - BREAK

13:00-15:00 - Analyzing interactions: informally and formally
Antonio Cerone (Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan)


SCHEDULE

GMT+2: CEST


Schedule for Other Time Zone: GMT+1: London | GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty | GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok
Back to List of Courses


Wednesday, 1 September 2021 - GMT+2: CEST (Berlin, Paris, Rome)

8:45-9:00 - OPENING

9:00-13:00 - Software Engineering for Robotics: RoboStar technology
Ana Cavalcanti, James Baxter, Pedro De Oliveira Salazar Ribeiro, Alvaro Miyazawa (University of York, UK)

13:00-14:00 - BREAK

14:00-16:00 - Modelling interactions: digital and physical
Alan Dix (Swansea University, UK)



Thursday, 2 September 2021 - GMT+2: CEST (Berlin, Paris, Rome)

11:00-12:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 1)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

12:00-13:00 - Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (Part 1)
Juliana Küster Filipe Bowles (University of St. Andrews, UK)

13:00-15:00 - BREAK

15:00-16:00 - Process Mining (Part 1: Introduction)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)



Friday, 3 September 2021 - GMT+2: CEST (Berlin, Paris, Rome)

10:00-12:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 2)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

12:00-13:00 - Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (Part 2)
Juliana Küster Filipe Bowles (University of St. Andrews, UK)

13:00-14:00 - BREAK

14:00-15:00 - Process Mining (Part 2: Example algorithms)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)

15:00-16:00 - Process Mining (Part 3: Applications)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)



Monday, 6 September 2021 - GMT+2: CEST (Berlin, Paris, Rome)

10:00-11:00 - Research and Industry (Security Research at Oracle Labs, Australia: Program Analysis Meets Security)
Padmanabhan Krishnan (Oracle Labs, Australia)

11:00-12:00 - Research and Industry (Formal Methods Adoption in Industry: An Experience Report)
Ben Tyler (Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan)



Tuesday, 7 September 2021 - GMT+2: CEST (Berlin, Paris, Rome)

11:00-13:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 3)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

13:00-14:00 - BREAK

14:00-16:00 - Analyzing interactions: informally and formally
Antonio Cerone (Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan)


SCHEDULE

GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok


Schedule for Other Time Zone: GMT+1: London | GMT+2: CEST (Berlin, Paris, Rome) | GMT+6: Nur-Sultan, Almaty
Back to List of Courses


Wednesday, 1 September 2021 - GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok

16:45-17:00 - OPENING

17:00-21:00 - Software Engineering for Robotics: RoboStar technology
Ana Cavalcanti, James Baxter, Pedro De Oliveira Salazar Ribeiro, Alvaro Miyazawa (University of York, UK)

21:00-22:00 - BREAK

22:00-24:00 - Modelling interactions: digital and physical
Alan Dix (Swansea University, UK)



Thursday, 2 September 2021 - GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok

19:00-20:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 1)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

20:00-21:00 - Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (Part 1)
Juliana Küster Filipe Bowles (University of St. Andrews, UK)

21:00-23:00 - BREAK

23:00-24:00 - Process Mining (Part 1: Introduction)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)



Friday, 3 September 2021 - GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok

18:00-20:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 2)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

20:00-21:00 - Applying Formal Methods in Healthcare (Part 2)
Juliana Küster Filipe Bowles (University of St. Andrews, UK)

21:00-22:00 - BREAK

22:00-23:00 - Process Mining (Part 2: Example algorithms)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)

23:00-24:00 - Process Mining (Part 3: Applications)
Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen University, Germany)



Monday, 6 September 2021 - GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok

18:00-19:00 - Research and Industry (Security Research at Oracle Labs, Australia: Program Analysis Meets Security)
Padmanabhan Krishnan (Oracle Labs, Australia)

19:00-20:00 - Research and Industry (Formal Methods Adoption in Industry: An Experience Report)
Ben Tyler (Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan)



Tuesday, 7 September 2021 - GMT+10: AET (Brisbane, Sydney), Vladivostok

19:00-21:00 - A Tutorial to Maude (Part 3)
Peter Csaba Ölveczky (University of Oslo, Norway)

21:00-22:00 - BREAK

22:00-24:00 - Analyzing interactions: informally and formally
Antonio Cerone (Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan)

Organised by Nazarbayev University